London Screenwriters' Festival

Success stories from the festival

Posted on: September 20th, 2011 by Chris Jones 1 Comment

Henry placed 2nd out of 115 entries

It’s said you have to “speculate to accumulate” – and this certainly seems true in building your career as a screenwriter and/or filmmaker. It seems there are companies, initiatives and organisations everywhere just begging for your hard-earned cash, promising you training and opportunities in return. But are they worth it?

We can’t speak for the others, but we think London Screenwriters Festival is! We subscribe to the notion that we’re “all in this together” – and we designed the festival, its ethos and everything within it (including the schedule) on the basis of what WE’D like to have access to, as well! We got tired of expensive courses and schemes that offered time-limited opportunities to their delegates; we wanted to create a whole NETWORK for ours, not just in our private group but across social media and blogs, where people could meet and foster creative partnerships for years to come. The motto of London Screenwriters Festival is “inspire, educate, connect” on this basis.

But don’t take OUR word for it. There have been many success stories from last year’s festival already. We asked Henry Fosdike, the second place winner of our Short Script Challenge 2010 his thoughts on LSF and what he’s been up to since the festival…

“… Prior to the LSF, I hadn’t entered many competitions.” Henry says, “I was just starting my final year at Bournemouth University studying Scriptwriting for Film and Television and had decided that entering contests could be beneficial to my writing as it’s all feedback at the end of the day.”

Henry entered his dark short THE DECISION into our contest: “The original concept was for the job interview scenario to involve killing someone, a bit like those tough and violent movies that Asia have become so well known for (Battle Royale, Oldboy, etc.) The final ending only came as I was already writing it when I had a, “Oh hang on!” moment where everything suddenly came together.”

LSF’s readers noted Henry’s lean style of scene description and economical dialogue, scoring it highly on nearly all counts, meaning his script was number 2 out of a whopping 115 entries. “Naturally there was a tad of annoyance when I realised I was only one script away from winning,” Henry admits, “but that soon passed!” Henry won a ticket to the festival and was personally congratulated on stage by TV screenwriting legend Tony Jordan.

But that wasn’t it for THE DECISION, for new film production team White Tiger Films picked it up shortly after the festival, gaining Henry his first production credit. Director Trev Walsh and Henry got together after both posting on LSF Festival Organiser Lucy V’s “Film Shorts Club”, a registry of people interested in collaborating on short film. “The fact it was runner up in LSF’s contest peaked my interest,” says Trev. Like the readers at LSF however, Trev is complimentary of Henry’s writing – and his understand of logistics: “It was the writing itself and the fact that logistically it could be short with a tiny budget and in a great location I already had access to.”

There were lots to learn on the journey from the page to the screen for both Henry and Trev. “I learned a hell of a lot through the production process, a real baptism by fire.” Trev explains, “There were inevitable mistakes made during filming, but overall I am pleased with how it came together in the edit.” Henry agrees. “There wasn’t much editing of it that needed to be done, but there were a couple of slight changes for logistical purposes, including changing the gun from a pistol to a shotgun. It’s all the better for it.”

So what’s next for Henry and Trev? “Having just graduated, I am currently spending my days writing all sorts – a novel, a number of screenplays and a play. When I’m happy with the back catalogue, I shall go about trying to find an agent and hopefully go from there!” Says Henry. It’s more of the same for Trev, too: “I am currently in production on an ambitious short film with huge production values, Big Pink, which is aimed at Cannes 2012.” Big Pink was even written by LSF’s Short Script Challenge winner, Laurence Timms!

So was it all worth it? Henry thinks so – and recommends the festival itself, too. “I got some great tips from a wide variety of speakers – Linda Aronson being my personal favourite – and a chance to meet new people who are all just as passionate about writing as I am! Some of these people have become firm friends so I’d definitely recommend it to anyone pondering whether or not to attend.”

One Response

  1. Here’s a link to ‘The Decision’ for any one who’d like to watch…

    http://www.vimeo.com/19747934

    Looking forward to seeing what comes out of LSF2011!

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