Phil O'Shea - Screenwriter / Director

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WHY SHOULD YOU LISTEN TO HIM…?  Because he writes TV, plays, shorts and features – he’s a veritable master of the mediums!

WHO HE'S WORKED WITH...
ITV, SKY 1, The BBC








Screenwriter / Director Phil O'Shea is based in London and also works in the US and Germany. Phil wrote and co-directed the feature film VAMPIRE DIARY (recent winner best film Milan International Film Festival and three other major awards).

Phil also wrote the horror film SPIRIT TRAP starring Billie Piper and Luke Mably and the European thriller THE HARPIST. Phil has also written and directed a number of shorts including THE CRANE starring Jude Law and Lee Ross for the BFI New Directors scheme.

Phil’s writing for television includes DARK KNIGHT, OSCAR CHARLIE, WYCLIFFE, DREAM TEAM, RISK, YELLOWTHREAD STREET and CHUGGINGTON. Phil’s first stage play Playing For England was recently performed at the Kings Head Theatre.

Phil lectures on screenwriting at a number of universities and film schools and is in charge of screenwriting on the ‘Plays & Screenplays’ MA at London City University. Phil is a member of the Writers’ Guild Film Committee.




Q: What was your favourite film as a kid?
A: Chaplin's THE GOLDRUSH.

Q: Who inspired you when you were starting out?

A: Francois Truffaut.

Q: What was your big break?

A: Having a feature film script commissioned by British Screen.

Q: What was the best day in your career?

A: Winning four prizes including best film at the Milan International Film Festival.

Q: What has been your most important lesson?

A: The director Sam Fuller told me "Never lose your nerve".

Q: If a niece or nephew wanted to be in the business, what would you advise them?

A: Write it, then try to make it.

Q: What is the hardest part of your job and how do you overcome it?

A: Starting a new script. Get up early.

Q: What do you feel is a writers’ or filmmakers' key responsibility?

A: Avoiding indifference. Keeping the audience engaged.

Q: What mistakes do you see writers or film makers making over and over?

A: Imitation.

Q: What advice would you offer a writer?

A: Write.